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Classic Max Pocket, or Classic Max, is a series of multi-game handheld consoles manufactured by JungleTac and released in the late 2000s under various names. Two types of handhelds were released under this name: a vertically oriented system, and a horizontally oriented system that is more similar to a traditional handheld console.

Vertically oriented systems[]

The vertically oriented Classic Max Pocket systems appear to be the first iteration of the hardware, and were likely first released in 2007. These versions of the systems are designed similarly to a 2000s era personal digital assistant, with a vertical screen, buttons for B, A, and power below the screen, and a small directional pad placed at the bottom, where the direction and confirmation buttons on a PDA would usually be. Buttons for adjusting the volume are placed on the left side of the unit, and the speaker is placed on the back.

The vertical Classic Max Pocket systems use VT168 hardware and include unique games designed for the form factor. 12-in-1 and 30-in-1 units were released with an appropriate amount of games included in each one. The units take 3 AAA batteries, which are included and already installed when brand new, and the packaging (at least for the 12 in 1 units) has a hole cut out on the plastic window for the unit that exposes the power button along with a speech bubble pointing to it that says "Try me!". Both units start up to a short attract animation featuring gameplay from a game included on the 12 in 1 and 30 in 1, Dingle Hunt. Different menus are also used for each unit, with the 30 in 1 using the name "Pocket 30 in 1" on its menu.

Variants[]

Several variants of both the vertical 12 in 1 and 30 in 1 Classic Max Pocket systems are known to have been released, mainly in parts of Europe and Asia. Some of these variants are known to boot to an animated "Jungle Soft" logo when powered on, suggesting that they were directly based on OEM releases with little to no changes to the menu software. The 30 in 1 systems are generally more hard to find, with them only regularly appearing in Russia and parts of Asia.

12 in 1[]

  • Classic Max Pocket MX-10 - OEM release by JungleTac.
    • A "Deluxe Limited Edition" of the MX-10 12 in 1 is known to have been released, which has slightly different shapes for the A, B, and power buttons and claims to have a slightly different game selection, notably advertising the games Ocean Quest and Ocean Fantasy. It is only known to have been released in a solid white color.
  • Classic Max Pocket MX-10G - OEM release by JungleTac. Unlike the MX-10, this variation of the unit has round buttons for A and B and changes the design of the power button - this design is used for most of the known 12 in 1 units. Sold in a blue and white color scheme. Boots up with an animated "Jungle Soft" logo.[1]
    • While the packaging of this release of the Classic Max Pocket still advertises Ocean Quest and Ocean Fantasy like the MX-10's packaging, the unit includes the game Egypt Legend[2], which is not advertised anywhere on the packaging, suggesting that the game selection was changed for this unit before it was released.
  • Fujitel GameTron - Distributed in South American countries. Boots up with an animated "Jungle Soft" logo. Uses the same shell and buttons as the "Deluxe Limited Edition" 12 in 1, but has the same games as most variants of the unit.
  • Silvercrest Arcade Classic MX[3][4] - Distributed in Germany by Millennium 2000 GmbH. Unit's design is identical to the MX-10G. This variant displays a custom splash screen on boot that uses the name "Millennium Arcade" and features Mr. Onion from the title screen of the 16-bit version of his titular game.
  • Tom-Tec GC-12 PocketGame - Comes in near identical packaging to the OEM release from JungleTac. Unit's design is identical to the MX-10G. Boots up with an animated "Jungle Soft" logo.

30 in 1[]

  • Classic Max Pocket - Likely an OEM release by JungleTac. Known to have been sold in a red and white color scheme. Possibly sold in Canada.
  • Classic Pocket - Distributed by Cybertoy/CyberShell in Russia.[5]
  • Extra Classic Max Pocket - Distributed by a company named Extra. Color variants in solid blue and black are known to exist.
  • Ritmix Classic Max Pocket RZX-12[6] - Distributed in Russia by Ritmix. Available in a black and white color scheme.

Games[]

Classic Max Pocket 30 in 1 Dingle Hunt Title Screen

Classic Max Pocket 30 in 1 displaying the title screen for Dingle Hunt.[7]

As is the case with JungleTac's other systems, the games on the vertical Classic Max Pocket systems are simple, arcade-style games, all of them designed for the vertical screen. Compared to their other systems, though, a decent amount of games included on these specific handhelds are of a noticeably higher quality, with the games being more well-presented, containing original high quality art (notably on the title screens) and music that is better composed than what would be present in a typical JungleTac game, and generally having more depth to them. The same games also typically feature a high score table. A few of these games in particular are confirmed to have been developed by Nice Code Software specifically for JungleTac, as three of the games included on the systems were listed on a webpage on Nice Code's now-defunct website listing the VT168 games they developed, and a screenshot for one of the games (Abey's Dream) featured a Jungle Soft copyright (the image on Nice Code's website was not archived).[8][9] Some of the other games on the vertical Classic Max Pocket systems also show strong signs of likely being developed by Nice Code as they share some sound effects and fonts with ones from Nice Code games on other platforms, particularly 16-bit games that were included with the Wiii3 205 in 1, and a few games also contain easter eggs mentioning known Nice Code staff. There are several games included on the systems that are more on par with JungleTac's own developed games, though, featuring equivalent music, artwork, and gameplay. Some of these games would later be ported to VT3xx hardware in a horizontal resolution for JungleTac's other consoles.

12 in 1[]

Dingle Hunt Arcade Classic MX

Dingle Hunt gameplay screenshot (from the Arcade Classic MX manual).

  1. Dingle Hunt - Nice Code-developed game. TwinBee clone. The default high score table names are Angel, Lucia, Jony, and Wayne[7]; Lucia, Jony, and Wayne are known Nice Code staff members (Lucia was an art designer, Jony mainly did art design and acted as a director for the 8-bit games Magic Jony and Fairy's Treasure, and Wayne is shown alongside other known staff on the about page of Nice Code's website[10]), and Angel is near identical to "Angell", who was credited as a programmer in various 8-bit Nice Code games. One of the sound effects used in this game is identical to the selection sound in Nice Code's 16-bit game Crazy Kart.[11]
  2. Egypt Legend - Tetris clone with an Ancient Egyptian theme. The default high score table names used are Jason, Amy, Chris, Wayne, and Who[7]; Jason and Wayne are known Nice Code staff members.
  3. Space Craft - Galaga clone that adds the ability for the player to freely move in the bottom half of the screen as opposed to only moving left and right. A sound effect in the game that plays when enemies fly into the screen is identical to one from Nice Code's 16-bit game Crazy Kart.[12]
  4. Zodiac Dreamers - A zodiac-themed Breakout clone. The "STAGE" font is near identical to one used in some of Nice Code's VT03 games, such as Commando and Curly Monkey 2.[13] The default high score table names used are Sting, Ann, Alex, and Wayne[7]; Sting and Wayne are known Nice Code staff members (Sting was credited as a programmer for some 8-bit Nice Code games), and Ann is similar to "Anne", who was credited for art design in some 8-bit Nice Code games.
  5. Gem World - A fantasy-themed puzzle game. It feature characters that correspond to difficulty levels. Pieces in the game are made up of two components, which are either colored blocks or objects. The default high score table names used are Peter, Sleet, Alex, and Leo[7]; Sleet is a known name for a programmer credited in some 8-bit Nice Code games, and the name Leo is used in Nice Code's 16-bit game Battle of Freekick for one of the playable soccer players (the game also uses the names of other known Nice Code staff for the playable soccer players).
  6. Stack Master - Another Tetris clone, which appears to be programmed differently compared to Egypt Legend. The "STAGE" font looks identical to one used in the 16-bit Nice Code games Crazy Kart and Flying Dream.[14]
  7. Double Punch - Clone of the obscure arcade game Triple Punch (which in itself is based on Amidar and Pepper II). The player controls Mr. Potato/Mr. Onion, who is also shown on the title screen. The logo on the title screen is directly based on the one for the Game Boy Advance game Mario Party Advance.
  8. Code Eagle - Named CodeEagle! Gold on the title screen. Clone of the arcade game Intrepid. Later ported to VT3xx hardware with different music.
  9. Pop Ball - A pinball game with a grassy aesthetic. This game would later be ported to VT3xx systems with different music, going by the name Farm Pinball.
  10. Go Go Go - Rally-X clone. Two variants of this game are known to exist - one has a "JungleSOFT 2007" copyright notice on the title screen and is only known to have been included on the Classic Max Pocket MX-10G[15]; the other variant removes this copyright notice and is known to be included on the Tom-Tec GC-12 PocketGame and Arcade Classic MX.
  11. Go Soccer - Soccer-themed reskin of Pop Ball. Later ported to VT3xx hardware.
  12. Save a Queen - A game that plays similarly to Frogger.

A "Deluxe Limited Edition" of the stock Classic Max Pocket 12 in 1 was released, which according to the back of the packaging, appears to contain a slightly different game selection from the other known variants of the 12 in 1. In particular, the games Egypt Legend and Stack Master would be swapped out for the following two games:

  • Ocean Quest
  • Ocean Fantasy - Appears to be a Tetris clone according to a picture on the back of the Deluxe Limited Edition's packaging.

It is unknown if these games were released on any vertical Classic Max Pocket units.

30 in 1[]

Abeys Dream Title Screen

Title screen of Abey's Dream, a game exclusive to the 30 in 1 Classic Max Pocket units.[16]

  1. Egypt Legend - See the 12 in 1 section.
  2. Dingle Hunt - See the 12 in 1 section.
  3. Zodiac Dreamers - See the 12 in 1 section.
  4. Space Craft - See the 12 in 1 section.
  5. Gem World - See the 12 in 1 section.
  6. First Defense - Space Invaders clone.
  7. Tiger Across - A game that plays similarly to Road Fighter.
  8. Dragon Tower - Heavily based on Nice Code's 8-bit game Climbing. Compared to the 8-bit game, this game adds a sword powerup that allows the player to attack.[7]
  9. The Night Job - A game where the player controls a burglar that has to steal files and videotapes from a building while not attracting the attention of a policeman. This game is notable for deviating from the pixel art aesthetic used in the rest of the Classic Max Pocket games and opting to use a more cartoony look instead.[7]
  10. Knocking Now - Believed to be developed by Nice Code.
  11. Up to the Sky - Based on Nice Code's 8-bit game Frantic Mouse, and features a monkey as the playable character.[7]
  12. Wonder Ball - Believed to be developed by Nice Code.
  13. Jig Chick - Nice Code-developed game. Its relationship to their VT03 game of the same name is unclear.
  14. Abey's Dream - Nice Code-developed game.
  15. Stack Master - See the 12 in 1 section.
  16. Pocket Crisis - Believed to be developed by Nice Code.
  17. Monster Hunter - Believed to be developed by Nice Code.
  18. Flame Beetles
  19. Go Go Go - See the 12 in 1 section.
  20. Down to 100
  21. FireFighter Bros
  22. Homeland Defence
  23. Code Eagle - See the 12 in 1 section.
  24. Double Punch - See the 12 in 1 section.
  25. Pop Ball
  26. Mystic Totem
  27. Happy Mice
  28. Baby Arms
  29. Go Soccer - See the 12 in 1 section.
  30. Save a Queen - See the 12 in 1 section.

Trivia[]

  • On the vertical 30 in 1 Classic Max Pocket units, holding A and B while powering on the unit will activate a self-test screen, which displays a version code (on the 30 in 1 units, this code is "058A44A7"). Pressing up and A together will cause the screen to generate a checksum, which takes a few minutes, and display it on screen. It is currently unknown if this self-test screen is present on the 12 in 1 units.

Gallery[]

Classic Max Pocket MX-10 (OEM)[]

Classic Max Pocket MX-10G (OEM)[]

Silvercrest Arcade Classic MX/Millennium Arcade[]

Extra Classic Max Pocket 30 in 1[]

Ritmix RZX-12[]

Horizontal systems[]

In the same year that the the vertical Classic Max Pocket handhelds were released, handhelds using the same Classic Max Pocket name with a horizontal form factor would also be released. A 12 in 1 model would be released as well as a 30 in 1 model, of which there are two known revisions. The 12 in 1 and 30 in 1 units come included with completely different games and like the vertical Classic Max Pocket units, display an attract animation of one of the included games, specifically Bubble Blaster/Ball Blaster, when powered on.

While the hardware the 12 in 1 models and a certain revision of the 30 in 1 model use is unknown, another revision of the horizontal 30 in 1 Classic Max Pocket uses completely different hardware compared to the vertical systems, running on a VT3xx system-on-a-chip. Both revisions of the horizontal 30 in 1 Classic Max Pocket look identical to each other and most other horizontal Classic Max Pocket units, and they also have the same splash screens and menu design - the only things that noticeably differentiate them are that the VT3xx revision of the horizontal 30 in 1 unit uses the name "Ball Blaster" in place of "Bubble Blaster" on the first page of its menu, and the music used in the versions of the games on each revision, including the game shown in their attract modes, are different, with most of the games on the VT3xx revision of the horizontal 30 in 1 unit using chiptune music, while the 12 in 1 and "unknown hardware" revision of the 30 in 1 use MIDI-style music like the vertical Classic Max Pocket games. Higher capacity units released later on would use VT3xx hardware and include games from the VT3xx revision of the horizontal 30 in 1 unit, as well as additionally including completely new games and ports of certain games from the vertical Classic Max Pocket units (namely ones not affiliated with Nice Code) modified to run in a horizontal resolution.

Variants[]

16bit game console handheld game player Classic-1-

Promotional image showcasing the colors the 30 in 1 horizontal Classic Max Pocket was sold in.

12 in 1[]

  • Classic Max Pocket MX-11 - OEM release by JungleTac. Boots to an animated "Jungle Soft" logo similar to some vertical Classic Max Pocket units.
  • 12 in 1 Colour Games Console - Distributed by Premier Portfolio International in the UK. Boots to an animated "Jungle Soft" logo.

30 in 1[]

  • 30 in 1 Colour Games Console - Distributed by Premier Portfolio International in the UK. Unit is the VT3xx revision of the horizontal 30 in 1 unit.
  • Heeha 100 - Distributed by Genius.
  • A stock 30 in 1 Classic Max Pocket was released that uses unknown hardware and contains games that have music that sounds more in line with music from the games on the horizontal 12 in 1 unit.[18]

High capacity units[]

Several variants of the horizontal Classic Max Pocket with a particularly large amount of games would be released by a few companies, notably from Lexibook. Despite using the same shells as the initial 12 in 1 and 30 in 1 units, most if not all of these units have more in common with the horizontal HiQ Classic handhelds that would later be released by JungleTac, coming included with versions of the games from those systems, which also includes horizontal resolution ports of games from the vertical Classic Max Pocket.

  • Classic Max Pocket MX-11 120 in 1 - Advertised on JungleTac's website.[19]
  • Reactor 120 in 1 - Splash screen is based on the one used in the HiQ Classic 140 in 1. Has TV out.
  • Zone Classic Max Pocket - Comes with 100 games built in.
  • Compact Cyber Arcade 120 in 1 - Distributed by Lexibook.
  • Compact Cyber Arcade JL2355 - Distributed by Lexibook. Comes with 200 games built in.
  • Compact Cyber Arcade JL2375 - Distributed by Lexibook. Comes with 250 games built in. Sold in red (JL2375RD), purple (JL2375PR), and black (JL2375BK) colors.
  • Compact Cyber Arcade JL2377 - Distributed by Lexibook. Comes with 250 games built in. Unlike the other higher capacity units, this variant uses a completely different shell that is seemingly specific to Lexibook.

Games[]

12 in 1[]

  • Bubble Blaster
  • Gear Race
  • Hard Win
  • Hero Legend
  • Jewel Master
  • Mini Golf
  • Move Fun
  • Night Wings
  • North Salvation
  • Push the Box
  • Space Castle
  • Win or Lose

30 in 1[]

  • Bubble Blaster - A variant of Bubble Blaster on the horizontal 12 in 1 unit with minor graphical changes.
    • The VT3xx revision of the horizontal 30 in 1 Classic Max Pocket contains a slightly different version of this game named Ball Blaster, which replaces the music with standard 8-bit JungleTac music.
  • Ball Clash
  • Beat the Bird
  • Block Out
  • Crazy Hit
  • Dangerous Zone
  • Dream Bubble
  • Fancy Match
  • Garden Maze
  • Gear Race
  • Golden Arrow
  • Grass Cutter
  • Hanoi Tower
  • Happy Diamond
  • Hard Win
  • Hero Legend
  • Jewel Master
  • Lucky Lawn Mower
  • Mini Golf
  • Monkey N Fox
  • Move Fun
  • Mr. Onion
  • Night Wings
  • North Salvation
  • Ogreish Flower - A clone of the PC game Zeek the Geek.
  • Push the Box
  • Road Star
  • Sea War
  • Win or Lose
  • Worm Catch

HiQ Classic[]

Another line of handheld consoles would be produced by JungleTac after the Classic Max Pocket, going by the name HiQ Classic. Both horizontal and vertical handhelds were produced in this line, which use VT3xx hardware and come included with built-in games. Going by the model numbers provided for the consoles by JungleTac, the vertical handhelds may have been released first. On both the horizontal and vertical handhelds, some of the games are versions of games from the initial 30 in 1 horizontal Classic Max Pocket units, and a few may be ports of games from the vertical Classic Max Pocket based on their names.

Vertical handhelds[]

HiQ Classic Handheld Video Game

Promotional image for the HiQ Classic Q-1.

The vertical HiQ Classic handhelds use a similar form factor to the vertical Classic Max Pocket, but are smaller in size, using a smaller screen to accommodate for it. Unlike the Classic Max Pocket units, both the horizontal and vertical HiQ Classic units do not include an attract mode on boot up.

Variants[]

  • HiQ Classic Q-1 - Comes with 30 games built in.[20]
  • 30 in 1 HiQ Classic Electronic Game - Distributed by Premier Portfolio International.
  • ACL ME A-30 - Distributed by HCL Infosystems in India. Comes with 30 games built in. Sold in green and orange colors.
  • Heeha 300 - Distributed by Genius. Comes with 30 games built in. Has a custom splash screen that is shown on boot. The power and volume buttons are on the front of the unit at the left and right, the latter toggling the volume of the unit's audio at set intervals. Compared to most of the vertical HiQ Classic variants, the D-pad and A/B buttons are arranged in a layout similar to the Game Boy.
  • Zone Fusion - Distributed by Ultimate Products Ltd. Comes with 30 games built in. Sold in red and blue colors. This console has been dumped in MAME.

Games[]

Heeha 300:

  1. Fossick Underground
  2. Morra
  3. Puzzle Pop
  4. Imp and Cubes
  5. Bomb Hero
  6. Sodoku [sic]
  7. Garden Weeder
  8. Secret Bottle
  9. Homeland Defence - Same name as a game on the vertical Classic Max Pocket 30 in 1.
  10. Move Fun
  11. Grass Cutter
  12. Mystic Totem
  13. Ball Blaster
  14. Ogreish Flower
  15. Push the Box
  16. Ball Clash
  17. Win or Lose
  18. Flame Beetles
  19. Hard Win
  20. Hide and Seek
  21. Mister Easter
  22. Spring Bros.
  23. Happy Farm
  24. Find the Way
  25. Happy Mice - Same name as a game on the vertical Classic Max Pocket 30 in 1.
  26. Baby Arms - Same name as a game on the vertical Classic Max Pocket 30 in 1.
  27. Sea War
  28. Golden Arrow
  29. Road Star
  30. Winlinez

Zone Fusion:

  • Ball Blaster
  • Ball Clash
  • Beat the Bird
  • Block Flying
  • Block Out
  • Bomb Hero
  • Climbing Challenge
  • Find the Way
  • Flame Beetles
  • Fossick Underground
  • "Graden Weeder" (from back of packaging)
  • Happy Farm
  • Hard Win
  • Imp and Cubes
  • Jewel Master
  • Little Plane
  • Morra
  • Move Fun
  • Mr. Ball
  • Mr. Onion
  • Mystic Totem
  • Ogreish Flower
  • Pile the Box
  • Pool Quiz
  • Push the Box
  • Puzzle Pop
  • Secret Bottle
  • Win or Lose
  • Winlinez
  • Worm Catch

Horizontal systems[]

HiQ Classic Handheld Game

Promotional image for the 100 in 1 HiQ Classic Q-2.

The original horizontal HiQ Classic units have a similar form factor to the horizontal Classic Max Pocket units, but their design is completely unique and only one action button is present. In addition, a reset button is added at the front of the unit and a single volume button is placed next to the reset button as opposed to proper volume buttons like on the vertical Classic Max Pocket.

Variants[]

  • HiQ Classic Q-2 - OEM release by JungleTac.
    • HiQ Classic 100 in 1[21]
    • HiQ Classic 140 in 1 - Released in 2011. Boots to a splash screen that is near identical to one on the Reactor 120 in 1.
  • Mini Arcade Center JL1800 - Distributed by Lexibook. Comes with 30 games built in.
  • Frozen Compact Cyber Arcade - Licensed variant of the HiQ Classic based on Disney's Frozen distributed by Lexibook. Comes with 150 games built in. This console has been dumped in MAME.

Gallery[]

Vertical systems[]

Horizontal systems[]

References[]

External links[]

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