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This page details variations of software built-in to Famiclone and plug & play consoles that were produced by Waixing.

Most, if not all, of Waixing's VT02/VT03 titles were licensed from other plug & play developers; including Nice Code Software, Inventor, Cube Technology, Hummer Team, and the unknown JungleTac-affiliated company. Waixing's releases of these games often changed the titles and graphics, and were all registered under separate, individual copyright. Further details on the games themselves can be found on the respective companies' pages.

Waixing also produced a series of 16-bit games on both VT168 hardware and Sunplus SPG hardware. Several titles were ported to both chipset types, with little-to-no differences between versions; though some games (particularly sports titles) are exclusive to one or the other. These releases seem to have been developed by Waixing internally, but many of them are based on the outsourced VT02/03 titles (particularly those from the unknown JungleTac affiliate). There is an additional set of advanced 32-bit games, running on Sunplus SPG293 architecture.

Going by the copyright registries, there is at least one other type of architecture the games were developed for (as some games have four unique registries, with VT02/03 sharing the same copyright); it is currently unknown what this platform is, however.

8-bit and 16-bit games[]

Games produced by Waixing[]

Games which were seemingly solely produced by Waixing themselves.

General[]

Game Title Alt. Titles Platform(s) Notes
Add 'em Up - Now with Puzzle Mode N/A VT03, VT168, 16-bit SPG Unauthorized port of the PC game.
Apple Chess N/A VT168 only An Othello/Reversi game.
Bee Fighting Bee Eliminator VT168, 16-bit SPG A Galaga clone; the tractor beam instantly kills the player instead of capturing the ship. The title screen features what seems to be early promotional artwork of Sonic strangely modified into a bee.
Bomberman Bomber
Simon
VT168, 16-bit SPG A Bomberman clone, using the proper Bomberman logo and character.
Boxworld Smart Porter VT168, 16-bit SPG A Soukoban clone. Named after a Nice Code-derived VT02/03 game, but the VT168 release is rather original in comparison.
Card Solicard VT168 only A Klondike solitaire game.
Chessmaster Chess 16-bit SPG only A virtual chess game.
Dancing Girls Dance Girls
Dance Master
16-bit SPG only Somewhat of a Dance Dance Revolution clone; there is only one song, and the arrows do not actually sync to the song's beat.
Desert Storm N/A VT02, VT03 A Contra clone; originally released in 1996 for the Famicom as a cartridge and with the name Desert Storm: Nightmare Snaps Soul, reissued for plug & plays. The game removes swastika-like symbols compared to the original cartridge release, though this change likely predates the "plug & play" revision.
Dragon Knife
(屠龙刀)
N/A VT02 A beat-em-up game similar to Double Dragon. Originally released in 1994-95 by Chengdu Tai Jing Da Dong Computer Co, the predecessor to Waixing; it was reissued for plug & plays with an English translation.
Fish War N/A VT168, 16-bit SPG A Shark! Shark! clone. Named after a Nice Code-derived VT02/03 game, but the VT168 release is rather original in comparison.
Go Go Dancing N/A VT168 only A Dance Dance Revolution clone; uses prerendered 3D graphics.
Happy Biqi - World Flghter
(快乐比奇 - 地球战士)
N/A VT02 A clone of Earthworm Jim 2 with original graphics. Originally released in 1996 as Happy Biqi III: World Fighter; it was reissued for plug & plays with an English translation and the copyright screen removed.
Happy Driver N/A VT168 only Clone of a minigame from Richard Scarry's Busytown for Sega Genesis.
Huarongdao
(华容道)
Trizone Combat VT02, VT03 An adaption of the wooden puzzle game, better known in English as Klotski. Originally released in 1996 as part of the Primary School Mathematics CAI 3-in-1 cartridge; it was reissued for plug & plays with an English translation and new title screen.
Jazz Drum N/A VT168, 16-bit SPG A Dance Dance Revolution clone. The VT168 and 16-bit SPG versions are distinct ports from each other, featuring different graphics and more music tracks in the latter. The VT168 version appears to use graphics from a "dress-up doll" website.
Karuko Master N/A VT03, VT168, 16-bit SPG Unauthorized port of the PC game.
The Lion King Legend N/A VT02 A clone of The Lion King for SNES/Genesis. Originally released in 1997 as The Lion King Legeng; it was reissued for plug & plays with the typo corrected and the Chinese-language story sequences removed.
Merry Noshery N/A VT168 only Clone of a minigame from Richard Scarry's Busytown for Sega Genesis.
The Mouse and the Cat Cat & Mouse VT168, 16-bit SPG A Pac-Man clone; oddly, the player cannot eat dots after obtaining a Power Pellet. The VT168 and 16-bit SPG versions are distinct ports from each other, featuring different graphics and music.
Operation Cobra Strike Operation: Cobra Strike (packaging of SDW Games release) 16-bit SPG only A first-person shooter; the screen scrolls automatically (explained by the game as the player driving a jeep), and must attack incoming terrorists with an arsenal of weapons. You move a crosshair with the direction pad to aim. A version of this game that uses light gun controls was released in early 2006 on an uncommon dedicated plug and play unit by SDW Games named Operation: Cobra Strike[1][2], which is identical to the generic plug and play version with the exception of SDW Games branding being present on the title screen and a splash screen that appears before the game starts.[3] The generic plug and play versions have a short delay in between the end and start of background music loops[4], while the music in the SDW Games version seamlessly loops. The light gun on the dedicated unit from SDW Games only works with CRT televisions.
Poker Showhand N/A VT168 only A poker game; uncommon due to featuring risque themes.
Protean Girl Discover VT168 only Clone of Gals Panic, which in itself is a clone of Qix; uncommon due to its risque nature.
Pyramid N/A VT168 only A Zuma clone with different level layouts and an ancient Egyptian theme. Known to be included as one of the 16 built-in games on the DreamGEAR World Series Baseball TV game console, but otherwise appears to be uncommon. Curiously, a VT369 conversion of the game appears unused in the code of several Cube Technology handhelds; suggesting it may actually be a Cube Tech production.
Saving Rabbit Bill N/A 16-bit SPG only A Whac-a-Mole game where the player hits wolves to defend a rabbit; the wolves pull out a shotgun and fire at the rabbit if not whacked.
Sudoku Soduku
Sudoko
16-bit SPG only A Sudoku game. Two versions of this game exist: a version included on generic plug and play units, and a version of this game released on a uncommon dedicated plug and play unit named Sudoku: Do You Sudoku? in 2005 by SDW Games that is more fleshed out compared to the generic plug and play version.[5]
Super Contra 7
Super Fight I
Xtreme Robot
Super Contra 8 VT02, VT03 Originally released in 1996, reissued for plug & plays. Some releases of Super Fight I are reduced in size (from 256k to 192k) with removed levels.
Super Fighter N/A 16-bit SPG only A fighting game similar to Street Fighter. Playable characters include Bertram, Alfred, Kellogg, Leopold, and Rossetti.
Super X-Man Commander VT168, 16-bit SPG A Contra clone. Commander still has a voice clip saying "Super X-Man" on the title screen. The 16-bit SPG version of Super X-Man has no voice and appears to be more advanced (including multiple selectable characters).
Sword of Warrior N/A 16-bit SPG only A somewhat advanced, top-down action game where the player attacks enemies while collecting treasure; the player can use a sword or ninja stars as attacks.
Tennis Ball
(网球 - Tennis Ball)
N/A VT02, VT03 A first-person tennis game.
Undersea Adventure Scuba Brick 16-bit SPG only A Breakout clone.
Zuma Ball Shoot VT168, 16-bit SPG A close clone of Zuma.

Wii clone sports games[]

A set of games designed for Wii clones, the majority of which use motion control. While loosely derived from Wii Sports, the Waixing titles include more exotic sports choices (such as fencing and swimming). Note that some VT168 consoles mix Cube Technology sports games in with the Waixing sports titles, which are otherwise not Waixing-developed or distributed.

Game Title Alt. Titles Platform(s) Notes
Baseball Live! Baseball (VTG Interactive, title screen) 16-bit SPG only Two versions of this game exist: a version released on Wii clones simply titled Baseball, and a standalone version named Virtual Baseball that was released in the 2000s by VTG Interactive as a cartridge with baseball bat and mat peripherals, which were designed to be used with a separately sold proprietary console to play the game on.

Multiple variants of the generic Baseball version are known to exist - one variant features one of VTG Interactive's logos partially visible in one of the stadiums (likely a leftover from a VTG Interactive release) and is known to be included on the Reactor 32 in 1 and Zone 40, and another variant removes this logo from the stadium in question, which is known to be included on the TaiKee Interactive TV Games 49-in-1 and Zone Mini. Two revisions of the VTG Interactive Virtual Baseball are known to have been produced, which primarily change the animated splash screens to use different VTG Interactive logos, and one of these revisions is dumped in MAME. Based on text strings in the ROM data of this revision, the Virtual Baseball release was built for the Sunplus SPG288 platform.
Basketball 3-Point Shooter
Super Shoot
16-bit SPG only
Beach Volleyball N/A 16-bit SPG only
Billiards N/A VT168 only A Side Pocket clone.
Bowling N/A VT168, 16-bit SPG A first-person bowling game. Somewhat infamous for featuring Wallace Breen from Half-Life 2 as a selectable player.
Boxing N/A VT168 only
Competitive Fencing Fencing Champ 16-bit SPG only A one-on-one fencing game with a side perspective. The game has a roster of 8 people you can play as, each one representing a country and having different stats for power, speed and skill: Amber representing France, Senior representing Italy, Lucy representing Japan, Nixon (who is African-American) representing the United States, Ivy representing South Korea, Michael representing the United Kingdom, Nikita representing Russia, and Ken representing China.
Curling N/A 16-bit SPG only
Darts Dart
Dart's
16-bit SPG only A competitive dart throwing game. You play as one of two characters, Anderson and Fredrick. The person not chosen will be your opponent. Some sound effects are taken from The King of Fighters arcade games.
Fencing N/A VT168, 16-bit SPG Effectively a simplified version of Competitive Fencing.
Fishing N/A 16-bit SPG only
Golf Golf Pro VT168, 16-bit SPG
Happy Badmintoon Happy Badminton 16-bit SPG only Seemingly a clone of Super Dyna'mix Badminton for the Famicom; appears to use graphics from a "dress-up doll" website.
Master Golf N/A VT168 only
Ping Pong
(VT168)
N/A VT168 only
Ping Pong
(16-bit SPG)
Ping Pong Cup 16-bit SPG only
Place Kick Master: Football Championship N/A VT168, 16-bit SPG A soccer kicking/goalkeeping game.
Soccer Football
Soccer Shooter
16-bit SPG only A soccer kicking/goalkeeping game.
Swimming N/A 16-bit SPG only A swimming race with a side perspective; similar to a set of Nice Code Track & Field clones found on VT02/03 consoles, but the VT168 version is original in comparison.
Tennis Pro Tennis
Virtual Tennis
16-bit SPG only The Virtual Tennis version was likely released in the 2000s by VTG Interactive as a standalone cartridge game that would be bundled with a tennis racket peripheral. These were intended to be used with a proprietary console to play the game on. Waixing would also sell the standalone cartridge version of this game along with the console on their English Alibaba page as early as 2005.[6]
Tennis Exciting N/A VT168 only
Virtual Boxing N/A 16-bit SPG only A standalone version of this game was released in the 2000s by VTG Interactive as a cartridge bundled with boxing glove peripherals, which were designed to be used with a proprietary console. Waixing would also sell the standalone cartridge version of this game along with the console on their English Alibaba page as early as 2005.[6]
World Series Baseball Interactive VT168 only A first-person baseball game; it strongly resembles the VT02 game TV Baseball by Nice Code Software. The intro uses graphics from Baseball Stars 2 for the Neo-Geo. This game was released on a cartridge bundled with the DreamGEAR World Series Baseball TV game console, which uses the World Series name on the title screen. The console also comes with 16 games built in, most of them happening to be other VT168 Waixing games.
Various Track & Field clones N/A VT168, 16-bit SPG Clones of Track & Field events, separated into individual "games". Titles include 100 Meter Dash, 110 Meter Hurdles, Archery Advance, High Jump, Javelin Throw, Long Jump, and Triple Jump; in addition to the Nice Code-originating Discus Put, and an original Walking Race event. Oddly, Skeet Shooting is only featured on VT168 consoles, with no proper game title (labeled as either "Shooter" or "Trap" in the game select menu).

Games produced by the unknown JungleTac-affiliated company[]

Compared to the original releases, Waixing's VT02 versions generally only add new title screen graphics and music; some games are only known to exist in Waixing form. The VT168 versions are much larger overhauls, adding various new features.

Original Game Waixing Title Platform(s) Notes
Balloon Pop Shooting Ballons VT02, VT03, VT168, 16-bit SPG Sometimes retitled Shooting Balloons or Pop Balloons.
Boxing Boxing Wrestle VT02, VT03 The VT03 version uses a picture of The Rock on the title screen.
Drop Em Hitting Mices
(all platforms)
Mouse Bang
(VT168, 16-bit SPG)
VT02, VT03, VT168, 16-bit SPG The VT168 port uses the Donkey Kong NES title screen theme, as well as artwork from Donkey Kong Country and Tom & Jerry. Mouse Bang (another VT168 variant) replaces Donkey Kong with a modified version of Woody from Toy Story but retains the Donkey Kong music. Sometimes retitled Hitting Mice.
Get Em Super Ward VT03 Waixing seemingly did not publish the original VT02 version, instead creating an extensive VT03 hack titled Super Ward.
Hungry Worm Edacity Snakes VT02, VT03, VT168, 16-bit SPG For unknown reasons, the VT168 version features a title screen mimicking the first Sonic the Hedgehog game (complete with Sonic's waving finger). Sometimes retitled as just Snakes.
Paddle Fun Table Tennis VT02, VT03
N/A Desert Gunman VT02, VT03, VT168 A Wild Gunman hack; the VT02/03 versions use the lightgun, while the VT168 version uses a virtual crosshair with button inputs.
N/A Diamond VT02, VT03, VT168
N/A Explorer VT02, VT03
N/A Fireman VT02, VT03, VT168, 16-bit SPG
N/A Guard Farm VT02, VT03, VT168 A Duck Hunt hack; the VT02/03 versions use the lightgun, while the VT168 version uses a virtual crosshair with button inputs.
N/A Highway Racing I VT02, VT03, VT168, 16-bit SPG The VT168 version uses graphics from Rally Chase for the Neo-Geo. Sometimes retitled as Highway Racing (without the "I") or just Racing.
N/A Lawn Purge VT02, VT03, VT168
N/A Overspeed Racing
(all platforms)
MX Motor Storm
(VT168, 16-bit SPG)
VT02, VT03, VT168, 16-bit SPG Overspeed Racing is sometimes retitled Racing Course or just Speed Racing; MX Motor Storm is sometimes retitled MX Motorcycle Ninja.
N/A Police Skill VT02, VT03, VT168 A Hogan's Alley hack; the VT02/03 versions use the lightgun, while the VT168 version uses a virtual crosshair with button inputs.
N/A Plumber VT02, VT03 The VT03 title screen features modified artwork from Super Mario 64 with Mario's head replaced with a generic anime boy.
N/A Square VT02, VT03, VT168, 16-bit SPG While the original version is a clone of Tengen's NES port of Tetris, the VT168 release is a clone of Puzzled for the Neo-Geo. Sometimes retitled Squares or Cubes.
N/A Tank VT02, VT03, VT168, 16-bit SPG Sometimes retitled Tanks or Catch 22.
N/A Xmas Gift VT02, VT03

Games produced by Cube Technology[]

Waixing's releases of Cube Technology VT03 games are almost identical to the original releases; however, the sampled sound is replaced with standard, NES-capable music. Some games are only known to exist in Waixing form.

Original Game Waixing Title Platform(s) Notes
Access Block Access Block VT03 Waixing's version uses a rendition of Terriermon's theme from Digimon Battle Spirit.
Cat vs. Dog Cat vs. Dog VT03 Waixing's version uses a rendition of the Winnie the Pooh theme.
Get Lost Get Lost VT03
Germ Killer Germ Killer VT03 Waixing's version uses a weirdly off-putting rendition of the theme to Gentlemen of Fortune, a Soviet comedy film.
Helli-Mission Helli-Mission VT03 Waixing's version uses a rendition of the "Tim 2" tune from Lemmings.
Magical Kitchen Magical Kitchen VT03 Waixing's version uses what is possibly a rendition of the Rugrats theme.
Maze Puzzle Maze Puzzle VT03
Ocean Prospect Ocean Prospect VT03
Pop Monster Pop Monster VT03
Underwater Rescuse Underwater Rescue
Underwater Rescuse
VT03
Water Fire Water Fire VT03
X Ball X Ball VT03
N/A 2D Escape VT03
N/A Car Park VT03
N/A Chess Master VT03
N/A Clever Way VT03
N/A Connect Pipe VT03
N/A Dodgeball VT03
N/A E.T. - The Extra-Terrestrial VT03 Generic game similar to Pop Monster; not to be confused with the movie or infamous Atari 2600 game.
N/A Fishing Super VT03
N/A HQ Fighter VT03
N/A Magic Doors VT03
N/A Mars Worm VT03
N/A Maze Treasure VT03
N/A Super Tank VT03
N/A UFO Capture VT03

Games produced by Inventor[]

Waixing's releases of Inventor games, bizarrely, remove large amounts of levels compared to the original releases; presumably, this was some form of negotiation for Waixing to own their separate copyrighted version.

Original Game Waixing Title Platform(s) Notes
Alienis Alienis
Monster War
Pulver
VT02, VT03 Monster War and Pulver are based on the Nice Code releases of Alienis rather than the Inventor version.
Blood of Jurassic Jurassic Park VT02 The original Inventor version features 6 levels, while Waixing's version only has 2 levels.
F-22 F-22 VT02, VT03 The original Inventor version features 16 levels, while Waixing's version only has 3 levels.
Monkey King Monkey King VT02

Games produced by Nice Code Software[]

While initially believed to have produced custom hacks themselves, Waixing's Nice Code-based titles are almost entirely comprised of preexisting variants, with a number of further alterations. This includes games licensed directly from Nice Code (mainly "Copyright 200[x]" versions), in addition to the "TWLS" Intellivision variants, Qi Sheng Long VT03 hacks, and a set of uncommon VT02 versions from an unknown company. Due to this bizarre mixture of sources, Waixing's releases are effectively layers upon layers of hacks.

Roughly 70 titles originating from Nice Code were re-hacked by Waixing, to various degrees. Many games have both a VT02 and a VT03 variant, and/or have additional hacked versions as different "games" (likely as a result from licensing through different companies). Due to the large amount of entries, the games are not listed in full; though some aspects of particular note are as follows:

  • The game selection seems to be mostly comprised of titles released in or before 2004. As such, a large number of Nice Code titles that were seemingly produced post-2004 (such as the "Nature Clan" games) are not included.
  • A random assortment of VT02 games are unhacked entirely from their source; examples include Blob Man, Convection, and Five Days (which were originally Power Joy/"Copyright 200[x]" titles).
  • Many games from an unknown VT02 company were re-copyrighted in Waixing's game set, with little-to-no changes present; the original games appear sparsely on select plug & plays, such as the German "Super Arcade 110" console. Example games include Lucky Time (Mad Xmas hack), Penguin (Frantic Mouse hack), and Road Hero (Lightning hack).
  • The VT02 games Exist, Orchard Kavass, and Trooper - hacks of the Intellivision games Shark Shark!, Buzz Bombers, and Astrosmash, respectively - strongly resemble a series of "advanced" Inventor hacks (e.g. the Balloon Fight hack Fishwar). However, the related hacks are not generally present in Waixing releases, likely for legal reasons.
  • A large amount of games are modified from the uncommon Qi Sheng Long VT03 library; the original games appear on consoles such as the "Overmax 151-in-1" and "Sports Game 69-in-1". Most of Waixing's versions change the game title, replace the game's music, or both; but almost always leave further graphics untouched. Examples include Horrible Area (Lemon Brat; a Thin Ice hack) and M Day (Sea Monster; a Space Armada hack).
    • Similarly to the above, a few games are copied from the "common" VT03 set (which is not directly Q.S.L.-affiliated). Examples include Way Out (Girl; a Maze Maid hack) and Triple (Bubbles; a Magic Bubble hack).
  • When retitling preexisting VT03 hacks, their titles are strangely renamed to "match" a VT02 counterpart. For example, Mask (a Twin Fish hack featuring tribal masks) was illogically renamed to Twin Copters, to match a VT02 version featuring helicopters. In one bizarre instance, Cryptic Base (a Gallagant hack) was renamed to Aether Fighter; a name Waixing used for an Astrosmash hack, indicating Waixing confused two actually-separate games as being the same title.
  • Further VT03 hacks were actually produced by Waixing themselves; however, they are almost entirely color-enhanced versions of preexisting VT02 hacks, rather than fully redrawing the graphics or changing the theme. Some games of this type do not actually have their VT02 version present in Waixing's set.

Unauthorized hacks[]

Several unauthorized hacks of other NES/Famicom games were featured on Waixing Famiclones, including:

Original Game Waixing Title Platform(s) Notes
Astro Fang - Super Machine Crazy Racing VT03
Dragon Ball Z - Super Butoden 2 Impartial Judge VT02 Originally released in 1996, it was reissued for plug & plays with the copyright screen removed; oddly, it is left untranslated from Chinese.
Eliminator Boat Duel Boat Race VT03
Slalom Slalom VT03
Track & Field 110m Hurdles VT02 For unknown reasons, Waixing's extracted version of 110m Hurdles is a basic graphic hack of Track & Field. Other Track & Field events distributed by Waixing are based on the Nice Code "Olympic" versions.

Games produced by other known developers[]

Other titles in which the original developer is known to not be Waixing.

Original Game Waixing Title Original Developer Platform(s) Notes
Apple Chess Apple Chess Subor VT02, VT03
Soccer of the World Goal Keeper
Penalty Kick
Hummer Team VT02, VT03 Separates the kicking and goalkeeping portions into two different games.
Solitaire Solitaire Subor VT02, VT03
Sudo King Shudu Unknown, but not Waixing VT02, VT03, VT168 A Sudoku game; while the more common version is a hack of Sudo King, there is an alternate variant (under separate copyright) that may be Waixing-programmed.

32-bit games[]

While not being the only bootleg company to do so, Waixing is known to be behind the development of various games that would see use on many 32-bit consoles based on the Sunplus SPG293 chipset. These consoles were usually manufactured by Subor and are generally Wii clones (i.e., navigated with a Wii-like remote controller), with the most well known ones being released in the Lexibook TV Game Console line of plug and play systems starting in 2015. The consoles' UI is often modeled after a personal computer, including assets from both Windows and Mac. Additional games from the VT02/03 library are included as ".wxn" file conversions, ran through a rather poor NES emulator. The consoles can also load photos, videos, and NES ROMs via a microSD card. Most of the native 32-bit games make use of pre-rendered 3D graphics, although some of them are entirely composed of sprite graphics.

In addition, there are also Kinect clone consoles (i.e. controlled using a camera sensor, with the player's own body). These often reuse the "Wii clone" library and come bundled with the same remote controllers, but feature additional games (or conversions of preexisting games) using the camera motion detector.

Reportedly, the games in both their English and Chinese versions, as well as a complete pack of .wxn games for use with the proprietary 32-bit NES emulator used to be officially available for download on the site istudy666.cn.[7] It's believed that all the games were hosted there as some English versions of the 32-bit consoles (namely, the very uncommon NTSC version of the Lexibook JG7420) contain help documentation claiming that more games could be downloaded from a website, although the website isn't listed on those specific consoles.[8] The istudy666.cn site has since been shut down and was last known to work in late 2020. While the .wxn pack was downloaded from istudy666 and archived back in 2011, and SD card packages for a couple Chinese versions of the 32-bit console hardware that include Chinese versions of the games were also archived from that website, it's not entirely clear if the known 32-bit games were all that was available on the site or if more were offered.

Sports games[]

These are sports games that usually appear in 32-bit Wii or Kinect clones manufactured by Subor. For the games that appear on the Wii clones, they tend to support a "motion" input from the Wii-like controllers and require that you hold the controller(s) horizontally to play.

Game Title Alt. Titles Platform type Notes
100Meter N/A Wii clone Based on the VT168/16-bit game 100 Meter Dash. Features unique announcer voice clips.
110Hurdles N/A Wii clone Based on the VT168/16-bit game 110 Meter Hurdles. Features unique announcer voice clips.
Archery Toxophily Wii clone Also known as Toxophily from the name of the .ELF file and data folder. A first-person archery game that uses pre-rendered graphics and is intended to be use with two controllers. Despite this, the game can still be played with just one controller.
Badminton N/A Wii clone
Baseball N/A Wii clone Reuses voice clips from the 16-bit game.
Beach Volleyball N/A Wii clone Loose adaptation of the 16-bit game. The confirmation sound in this game is a sound effect taken from the intro of the Super Famicom game Rockman X (known as Mega Man X internationally). There are two known English variants of this game: a variant with no copyright date and potentially other unknown differences that is only confirmed to come with the Japanese iSports Pro, and another with a copyright date of "2010SR016222" that's included in the common Lexibook releases of the 32-bit hardware.
Bowling N/A Wii and Kinect clones Loose adaptation of the VT168/16-bit game. In the Wii clone version, you choose one of three anthropomorphic characters that resemble mice to play as. You use the left and right direction buttons to set where to roll the ball, and the up and down direction buttons to set the curvature of the roll. You swing the controller to roll the ball, which will also determine how hard the swing is. In the Kinect clone version, you don't have the ability to choose a character and are simply taken directly into the game. You move your body to choose where you want to roll and swing your arms to roll. Both versions have the player character appear on the screen above the pins that shows where you're about to roll.

There are two English variants of the Wii clone version of this game known to exist. One version is only known to be included in the Japanese iSports Pro. It has a copyright date of "2009SR026103" on the title screen and the instructions option is misspelled "Instruction".[9] The other version is known to be included on the common Lexibook releases of the 32-bit hardware. It has no copyright date on the title screen and "Instructions" is now spelled correctly. It's unknown if there are any further differences between the two versions.
Canoe Slalom N/A Wii clone
Championship Boxing Boxing (menu only) Wii and Kinect clones The Wii clone version has a full-motion prerendered intro that transitions into the title screen and a character select screen that has music and stats for each fighter. The Kinect clone version removes the intro and title screen and has a more basic character select screen.
Curling N/A Wii clone Loose adaptation of the 16-bit game.
Darts N/A Wii and Kinect clones Loose adaptation of the 16-bit game. The two playable characters from the 16-bit game (Anderson and Frederick) retain their names in this version, but have completely new pre-rendered 3D models. In the Wii clone version, you can play as either one, while in the Kinect clone version, you can only play as Anderson. Two English variants of the Wii clone version of this game are known to exist: an earlier variant has a copyright date of "2008SR18797" and the banner in the stadium that appears during transitions says "SOUTH BEER"[10], while a later variant has a copyright date of "2009SR053774" and the banner on the stadium says "DARTS". The former has only been confirmed to exist on the Japanese release of the iSports Pro so far, while the latter is known to be included in the uncommon NTSC version of the Lexibook JG7420.
Discus N/A Wii clone Based on the VT168/16-bit game Discus Put. Features unique announcer voice clips.
Fencing N/A Wii clone Loose adaptation of the 16-bit game Competitive Fencing. Characters from the 16-bit game are brought over in this version with their original names and nationalities intact and now use pre-rendered 3D models, but are otherwise similar to their 16-bit counterparts. Gameplay isn't noticeably different from the 16-bit game, but pre-rendered full motion cutscenes are now used in the intro and in transitions that play right before each fight. The sound that plays when starting the game or confirming a choice is the bumper sound from the Genesis/Mega Drive Sonic the Hedgehog games.

This game was also present on the Subor C21, a Chinese exclusive variant of the 32-bit hardware that did not support the wireless Wii-like controllers and only came with two wired controllers that look more like traditional gamepads. It appears that the version of Fencing on that console was tweaked to use button controls only as opposed to both button controls and motion input.

There are two known English variants of this game: one lacks a copyright date on the title screen and potentially has other unknown differences, which is only known to come with the Japanese release of the iSports Pro, the other one has a copyright date of "2010SR003934" and is included in the more common Lexibook releases of the 32-bit hardware.
Fishing N/A Wii and Kinect clones Based on the 16-bit game. Has similar graphics for the level backgrounds and player characters, and a track used in the 16-bit game is also used in this game. There are two known English variants of the Wii clone version of this game: one variant has a logo on the title screen with the "Fishing" text properly capitalized, which is only known to come with the Japanese release of the iSports Pro, while another variant has the "Fishing" text in the logo in all capital letters, which is known to come with the common Lexibook releases of the 32-bit hardware. There do not appear to be any major differences between the two variants otherwise, and both have the same copyright date: "2009SR026104".
Football N/A Wii and Kinect clones A near exact clone of the Soccer Heading minigame from Wii Fit, with all obstacles being based on ones from the original game and the only differences between the two being the graphics and characters used. In the Wii clone version, instead of using motion controls to detect what direction your body is tilting to like the original game, you use the left, up, and right direction buttons on the controller to hit the soccer ball in that direction. The Kinect clone version does use motion detection from the camera to simulate motion controls for controlling your character, though.

There are two known English variants of the Wii clone version of this game: one with an animated intro of a soccer ball (football) flying in an arc motion from a stadium towards the screen to complete the game's logo on the title screen[11], and another variant where it just fades in to the title screen with a slightly different logo. The first variant is only known to exist on the Japanese release of the iSports Pro, while the latter is included in the common Lexibook releases of the 32-bit hardware. Both variants have a copyright date of "2010SR006446" (albeit in different fonts in each one).
Golf N/A Wii and Kinect clones Notable for using a Mode 7-like effect for the ground texture. There are two known English variants of the Wii clone version of this game: one variant has a copyright date of "2010SR024608" that is included in the common Lexibook releases of the 32-bit hardware, and another lacks a copyright date and potentially has other unknown differences, which is only known to come with the Japanese release of the iSports Pro.
High-Jump High Jump Wii clone Based on the VT168/16-bit game High Jump. Features unique announcer voice clips.
Horse Racing Speed N/A Wii and Kinect clones There are two known English variants of the Wii clone version of this game: one version has no copyright on the title screen and has the text "PUSH STARTS" near the bottom of the screen; the other version has a copyright date of "2010SR028990" at the bottom and "PUSH START" is now correctly spelled. The former is only known to come with the Japanese release of the iSports Pro, while the latter is known to come with the common Lexibook releases of the 32-bit hardware.
Javelin N/A Wii clone Based on the VT168/16-bit game Javelin Throw. Features unique announcer voice clips.
Jogging N/A Wii and Kinect clones A game where you jog with several other people. The characters that are in the game appear to be a part of the same family based on their names (i.e., "Father", "Mother", "Son", "Daughter"). The Wii clone version of the game uses the motion control of the controller to detect running. One of the songs that plays in the game is reused from the VT168 game Poker Showhand.
Long-Jump Long Jump Wii clone Based on the VT168/16-bit game Long Jump. Features unique announcer voice clips.
Mountain Biking N/A Wii clone A racing game with mountain bikes. Has a regular game mode that plays linearly and a level select. Two versions of this game were made: a version usually present in the Sports menu of the 32-bit consoles, and a version in the Game Player that uses the horizontal controller scheme.
PingPong N/A Wii clone There are two known versions of this game that have notable differences: one version uses the PINGPONG.AVI video from the common Lexibook releases of the 32-bit hardware for its intro[12], and another version has a unique intro featuring a blonde girl in sportswear. Both feature completely different graphics in game as well. The latter uses the blonde girl as an opponent in matches, while the former uses a completely different character.
Rock Climbing N/A Wii clone
Rope Skipping N/A Wii and Kinect clones The Wii clone version included in the common Lexibook releases of the 32-bit hardware has an intro that is played back from an AVI video included in the game's files.
Super Shoot Basketball (some Wii clone menus only) Wii and Kinect clones
Super Slider "SUPPRE SLIDER" (menu only) Wii and Kinect clones Skiing game. The Wii clone versions have a title screen and require two Wii-like controllers to use as skis, while the Kinect clone version uses motion detection and lacks a title screen. There are two known English variants of the Wii clone version of this game: one variant lacks a copyright date on the title screen and shows a level select screen that only shows the confirmation statuses for two controllers once you select a stage; the other variant has a copyright date of "2010SR004733" and shows the confirmation statuses for the two controllers as soon as you are shown the stage select screen, although you can still select a level before confirming the two controllers. The former is only known to come with the Japanese release of the iSports Pro, while the latter is known to come with the common Lexibook releases of the 32-bit hardware.
Swimming N/A Wii clone A loose adaptation of the 16-bit game. Instead of a side view, though, the game is presented at a front facing perspective.
Tennis N/A Wii and Kinect clones There are two known English variants of the Wii clone version of this game: one only has the option to play single player and is missing a copyright date on the title screen, while the other has options for a "Single Mode" and "VS Mode" and has a copyright date of "2009SR020676". The former is only known to come with the Japanese release of the iSports Pro, while the latter is known to come with the common Lexibook releases of the 32-bit hardware. The Kinect clone version of this game has no title screen and takes you straight to the character select screen. The character select screen in that version also excludes the stage select.
Trampoline N/A Wii clone A game that copies the trampoline event from the first Mario and Sonic at the Olympic Games game for the Nintendo Wii. You can play as a boy (Mike) or a girl (Ego), who have their own catchphrases when you select them. To play the game, you shake the controller when your character reaches the trampoline to bounce upwards. Eventually, you'll be presented with actions to perform, which are either buttons you need to press or a motion input, to be able to sustain your height. To win, you need to reach a height of 8.00m or more.
Triple-Jump Triple Jump Wii clone Based on the VT168/16-bit game Triple Jump. Features unique announcer voice clips.
Walking-Race Walking Racing Wii clone Based on the VT168/16-bit game Walking Race. Features unique announcer voice clips.

Camera-based motion games[]

Games that are exclusive to the Kinect clone systems and make use of their built in camera for motion detection.

Game Title Notes
Broad Jump
Chop Suey Clone of Fruit Ninja, but with the addition of vegetables and the removal of bombs. During gameplay, the screen displays the output of the camera from the Kinect clone with a kitchen overlay and the player has to slice incoming produce on the screen by moving their hands (or waving an object of their choosing, if they so choose) to score points. Slicing produce one time gives you one point, and one can cut the same produce up to two more times to get a 2 or 3 point combo. Unlike Fruit Ninja, the player has three lives that they start with (represented by the cleavers at the top right), and if the player misses a fruit or vegetable, that counts as one life lost. Losing all lives makes the game drop in the final score and show one of two animations of a girl in a chef's apron depending on how many points you earned (the girl is shown on the thumbnail for the game from the Kinect clone's menu). If you don't score enough points, the girl will wipe her face with a sad expression as if she's weeping.
Dancing Another Dance Dance Revolution clone. This particular clone is similar in presentation to the VT168 game Go Go Dancing. Like that game, all of the songs you can choose are licensed songs used without permission from their license holders. When you start the game, you're greeted with a character select screen where you can choose one of three characters to play as. The music used on the character select screen and results screen also appears to be another licensed song. Once you select a character, you're then greeted with a song list that's operated with motion controls. Choosing a song starts the game. To play the game, you move your hand(s) in the direction of the incoming arrows.

All songs used in this game are stored on the console as MP3 files, and some of them have metadata suggesting that they were pulled from official Dance Dance Revolution games (i.e., several songs are sourced from Solo BASS MIX and a few are sourced from 2ndMix). Shockingly, one of the songs in the game's song list is titled "LITTLE BITCH", which ironically is the same song as the identically named track in the original Dance Dance Revolution arcade game.[13]
Diamond Motion-controlled clone of Breakout with original graphics. The game over music is an arrangement of the NES/Famicom Donkey Kong menu music identical to the one used in the VT168 and 16-bit SPG versions of Hitting Mices.
Happy Mouse Whac-a-Mole game where you have to hit chipmunks that appear from the holes by moving your hands.
Hurdles
Javelin Throw Similar but unrelated to the Javelin sports game. You start off with a girl in a stadium holding a javelin, and you have to run in place in front of the camera to make the girl gain enough power to throw the javelin.
Jazz Drum Loose adaptation of the VT168/16-bit game. You're greeted with a song list when you start the game that has several songs available to choose from. Some of the songs appear to be licensed songs used without permission. The logo for the game is a blatant rip-off of the Guitar Hero logo.

Games[]

Game Title Platform type Notes
The 100 Level Wii clone A platforming game where in each level, you have to jump on top of floating platforms and avoid enemies and obstacles along the way in order to reach the 100th floor (hence the game's name). The game has normal and hard modes and has 4 levels in total. You can collect stars for points, as well as potions to recover health. In order to complete a level, you collect the trophy on the 100th floor. There are four types of floating platforms in this game: regular platforms that don't do anything, platforms with holes that spikes pop up from periodically, conveyor belts that move in a particular direction that will move your character off them, and mushrooms that act as springs if you hold the jump button while on them for a period of time. Other hazards will appear when you enter further levels.
9 Ball Wii clone Pool game.
ArmyChess Wii clone
Baccarat Wii clone
Backgammon Wii clone
Ball Blaster Wii clone Clone of Zuma; uses faux-Windows UI.
Bingo Wii clone Uses faux-Windows UI.
Black Jack Wii clone
Blazing Fighter Wii clone Loose adaptation of the 16-bit game Super Fighter. Uses original graphics (both pre-rendered 3D and sprites). Interestingly, the intro and title screen appear to use digital paintings. All names of the playable characters are recycled from Super Fighter, but otherwise have their names switched around (i.e., Bertram from Super Fighter is called Leopold in this game) or use completely different designs from their 16-bit counterparts. Announcer voice clips are also recycled from Super Fighter. For some reason, in battles, the names of both fighters will be completely different from the name of the characters on the character select.
Bomb Superman Wii clone A clone of Bomberman with original graphics.
Bricks Climber Wii clone A clone of Ice Climber with original graphics.
Bubble Boy Wii clone A clone of Puzzle Bobble with original graphics and a futuristic theme.
Cake Shop Wii clone A clone of the browser game of the same name with original graphics. Infamous for having caricatures of Superman and Batman, alongside a man dressed as SpongeBob SquarePants, as customers that can visit your shop.
Candy Bear Wii clone A direct clone of Super Mario Bros. with nearly identical level layouts, but completely original visuals. Some mechanics, namely Warp Pipes and kickable turtle shells, are not present, and the boss fights are redone from scratch. All of the music is taken and slightly recomposed from New Super Mario Bros., with the death sound effect sampled from Super Mario World.
Caribbean Stud Poker Wii clone
Cate Match Wii clone A "match 3" game themed around food.
Cheese Maze Wii clone A generic maze game where you have to traverse through several mazes made of cheese. Obstacles include cheese blocks that stretch in a certain direction and rotating red blocks made of cheese. You can collect candy canes to get extra lives.
Chessmaster Wii clone Loose adaptation of the 16-bit game. Uses faux-Windows UI.
Circus Wii clone A quite advanced circus-themed minigame collection. The first stage, "Wire Walking," is unlocked by default; the player must carry plates while crossing a tightrope on a unicycle. As rounds progress, the player's circus partner begins throwing tomatoes at her, and fires break out on the tightrope. The other four events each require 5,000 coins to unlock; three of them ("Jump Rings", "Jump Ball", and "Swing") are clones of levels 1, 3, and 5 from Circus Charlie, while "Seesaw" is a loose adaptation of Circus Atari.
Craps Wii clone
Crazy Fish Wii clone Based off of the VT168/16-bit game Fish War. Compared to that game, this one adds levels and making your fish grow is a speedier process.
Crazy Lamb Wii clone A clone of Pooyan with original graphics.
Crazy Step Wii clone A clone of Q-bert with a Mayan theme and original characters and enemies. Playable characters include "Doctor", a human with glasses, a fedora, and a walking cane, and "Tony", a dog.
Dinosaur Factory Wii clone A game where you assemble toy dinosaurs on a conveyor belt. The goal of each level in the game is to assemble a certain amount of dinosaurs. Children will sometimes enter the factory and request a specific dinosaur, which has to be assembled before the child gets upset and leaves, resulting in you losing points. Any other time a dinosaur is assembled, it will be put into a box and you'll still earn points.
Draw Trumps Wii clone Uses faux-Windows UI.
Dr. Genius Wii clone A direct clone of the PC game Professor Fizzwizzle with identical levels and original graphics. The playable character is "Doctor" from Crazy Step.
Extreme F-1 Wii clone A clone of Pole Position with original graphics.
Find Diff Wii clone A find the difference game. Has three difficulty levels: Easy, Normal (or "Ormal"), and Hard. Uses faux-Windows UI.
Firebolt Swordman Wii clone A shoot-em-up with two playable characters. Uses sprite graphics.
Flying Rabbit Wii clone Generic shoot-em-up with a rabbit character.
Forest Adventure Wii clone Clone of Wonder Boy/Adventure Island with original graphics.
Fruit Link Wii clone Generic matching game with a fruit theme. Has easy, normal, and hard difficulty modes. Uses faux-Windows UI.
Future Warrior Wii clone Top-down isometric shooter game. The music that plays when you clear a level is the first four seconds of the victory theme from Final Fantasy VIII.
Gin Rummy Wii clone
Gobang Wii clone Also called Five in a Row in-game. Uses faux-Windows UI.
Gold Digger Wii clone A game where you grab gold, gems, and rocks underground with a crane for points. There are 20 levels in the game and each one has a goal of a minimum amount of points you need to reach to pass the level. Depending on how large the gold pieces are, they can give you more points, and gems give you a significant amount of points. After passing a level, you can spend your points at a shop to buy power ups to increase the value of certain items or the strength of your crane to pull up certain items faster, such as rocks and boxes.
Greedy Cat Wii clone Skewer lines of the same three kind of fish to make them disappear. There are several known similar games where the player skewers fruit instead; Greedy Cat may be a gameplay clone of this concept.
Happy Concert Wii clone A basic rhythm game with two songs where you shake the first and second controllers when the musical notes reach the hit areas on the left and right respectively. Once you start the game, you're greeted with a nighttime city setting and a person in marching band gear. As you keep hitting notes, more people with marching band gear and instruments show up.
Hearts Wii clone Uses faux-Windows UI.
Highway Racing Wii clone Loose adaptation of the 8/16-bit game Highway Racing I.
Hitting Mice Wii and Kinect clones Loose adaptation of the 8/16-bit game.
I-GO Wii clone Uses a Windows 7 border to mimic a Windows UI.
Ice Hockey Wii clone
JumpChess Wii clone Chinese checkers. The name is likely the result of a literal translation from Chinese (跳棋 essentially translates to something like "jump chess" or "jump game"). Uses faux-Windows UI.
Keno Wii clone Uses faux-Windows UI.
Landlord Wii clone Uses faux-Windows UI.
Leisure Chess Wii clone
Little Fairy Wii clone Generic platformer starring a fairy character. There are 10 levels total, and they generally involve the player having to defeat enemies and collect the important items they drop in order to progress. The player can collect leaves for points and create cloud platforms to reach otherwise inaccessible areas of a level. It's currently not known if the 10th level is a boss level or not. The main theme that plays on the title screen and in game is a rendition of the Christmas carol "O Come, All Ye Faithful".
Little Hunter Wii and Kinect clones A javelin throwing game that takes place in a savannah. Each level has a score quota you need to meet to complete it. You earn points by throwing javelins at various wildlife, which strangely include griffon.
Little Ninja Wii clone A first person autoscrolling action game set in feudal Japan where you play as a ninja. You can fight with a sword, which you use by shaking the controller.
Little Postman Wii clone Loosely based on Paperboy, but with considerably different gameplay mechanics. The player must throw the required amount of packages into the mailboxes within a set time limit, while avoiding obstacles on the two-lane road.
Magic Fairy Wii clone A first person 2.5D shoot-em-up game with 4 levels. You play as a girl that rides either a pig with wings or a dragon depending on what you choose before the game starts, and has a wand that shoots energy balls when you shake the controller. Each level has a scrolling Mode 7-style ground texture and power ups that you can collect to upgrade your weapon.
Magic Rectangle Wii clone A Breakout clone with poor physics. An interesting note about this game is that when reaching Level 3 of the game, the "3" used in the level text is almost identical to the one in Metal Slug 3's logo.
Mahjong Wii clone Uses a Windows 7 window border to mimic a Windows UI.
Maze Adventure Wii clone A clone of the PC game Mummy Maze with original graphics.
Memory Card Wii clone Generic memory matching game. Some of the pictures used are renders of characters from the other 32-bit games.
Mini Checkers Wii clone A single-player checkers game where you have to clear the board to match a number of checkers specified before the game starts (currently the only known criteria is one checker piece remaining; it's unknown if the game introduces different criteria later on)
Mission 2068 Wii clone A clone of the Konami game Jackal. The game's logo rips off the one from Metal Slug 3. Uses sprite graphics.
Motor Storm Wii clone Loose adaptation of the VT168/16-bit game MX Motor Storm. Called Motoracer on the menu screens. Unlike the previous versions, this version has completely different sound effects and no music during gameplay as well as a complete overhaul in presentation and gameplay. This game also has a select screen to choose your racer and a level screen that highlights the level you're about to start in before taking you there.
The Mouse and the Cat Wii clone Loose adaptation of the 8/16-bit game. This version uses 3D models of Tom & Jerry, with Jerry turning into Spike upon eating a Power Pellet.
Move Ball Wii clone A clone of Soukoban, but instead of pushing boxes, you push spherical rocks into glowing orange boxes. The levels in this game quickly ramp up to a level of difficulty not usually seen in Soukoban clones on plug and plays and by the second or third level, can get quite tricky to solve. The music used for the help screen is a short loop of a track taken from the MMORPG game Dungeon Fighter Online.
Ninga Hero Wii clone Side-scrolling beat 'em up game featuring the ninja character from Little Ninja. Music is also recycled from Little Ninja.
Overspeed Racing Wii clone Loose adaptation of the 8/16-bit game.
Poker Wii clone
Puppy Corps Wii clone Internally named "DOG" according to its data folder. A beat 'em up fighting game themed around anthropomorphic animals in military outfits. You can choose one of four dogs to play as in the game.
Puzzle Bobble Wii clone Clone of the arcade game of the same name. Unlike Bubble Boy, this game is a more straightforward clone of the original game and uses a faux-Windows UI. Graphics are original, albeit generic, and the sounds used are copied from the original game. Based on the menu options and the presence of a second playfield in the game, this clone also appears to support two-player modes.
Rabbit Slide Wii clone Misspelled Rabbit Slipe in the Game Player. The game uses a top-down view and has a rabbit in a ball navigate through narrow pathways. You have to make it to the end while being mindful of how slippery the rabbit's movement is and making sure it doesn't fall off of the pathways.
Raindrop Adventure Wii clone Clone of Lode Runner with original graphics. Has 9 levels.
Robot Wii clone A Pac-Man clone, like The Mouse and the Cat, except it's robot themed. Uses original graphics, but the game's logo is very reminiscent of the one from the 2005 movie Robots.
Roulette Wheel Wii clone Roulette game. This game is notable for having a surprisingly large cursor (based on the hand cursor used in Windows versions prior to Vista/7) that is used to interact with the playfield in-game.
Running Wii clone Generic game in which you play as a rabbit that has to run away from a wolf in each level for a set amount of time. There are obstacles you have to avoid that will slow you down if you don't avoid them, and you have a couple power ups you can use to gain an advantage - you can collect dynamite and throw it at the wolf to stun it for a bit if it gets too close to you, and you can get a blue lighting bolt to increase your speed for a short while.
Show Hand Poker Wii clone Loose adaptation of the VT168 game Poker Showhand. Unlike the VT168 version, this version does not feature risque content. You can play against a boy or an old man. Uses a Windows 7 window border and menu strip to mimic a Windows UI.
Slot Machines Wii clone
Snake Wii clone Port of the VT168/16-bit version of Edacity Snakes with updated graphics and a different title screen.
SnowBall Wii and Kinect clones A game where you defeat opponents by throwing snowballs at them.
Solitaire Wii clone Uses faux-Windows UI, with a playfield somewhat resembling the Windows Vista and 7 versions of Solitaire.
Space Fighter Wii clone Generic shoot-em-up with sprite graphics. "Mission" font is taken from Metal Slug.
Space War Wii clone Clone of Galaga with original graphics. Internally named "BEE" according to its data folder, which is possibly a reference to the VT168/16-bit game Bee Fighting.
Special Mission Wii clone Clone of Contra with original graphics. In-game uses pre-rendered 3D graphics while the intro uses animated digital paintings. Holding left, right, A, and B on the help screen gives you 30 lives when you start the game.
Square Wii clone Loose adaptation of the 8/16-bit game. Voice clips and sound effects are reused from the 16-bit version.
Step Aerobics Wii clone Also known as "RhythmicGymnastics" from the name of the .ELF file and data folder. A basic rhythm game that uses two controllers, similar to Happy Concert. Instead of shaking the controllers, though, you press up or down (holding the controllers vertically) on either or both controllers depending on the direction of the arrow that falls down. You can choose to play as a boy or a girl and can choose one of two songs to play.
Storm Fighter Wii clone Generic shoot-em-up with original pre-rendered 3D graphics.
Submarine Battle Wii clone Similar to the Nice Code game Submarine. You control a submarine and send down missile on enemy ships while avoiding the enemies' missiles.
Sword of Warrior Wii clone Based on the original 16-bit game. Reuses sound effects from the 16-bit game. Two versions of this game were made. One version is usually located in the Sports menu of the 32-bit consoles that assumes vertical orientation of the controller, and assigns the action of using your weapon to motion control. Another version is included in the Game Player of some of the 32-bit consoles that assumes horizontal orientation of the controller. The latter is only known to be included on the Lexibook JG7425 221-in-1 console.
Sword Soul Wii clone A fighting game that focuses on weapons. It reuses character models from Sword of Warrior and Rock Climbing.
Table Hockey Wii clone
Tales of Treasures Wii clone A puzzle platformer game. You play as a little girl and have to mine all the gold present in each stage to reveal a door that will let you leave the stage. Each stage requires you to apply strategical and logical thinking when navigating the level and using items.
Tarrow Maze Wii clone A generic top-down fantasy role-playing game with an original story. You play as a warrior and have to obtain a cross on the 7th floor to rescue the princess in the maze. While traversing the maze, you will have to fight enemies, engage in side quests to free captives, and improve your stats by talking to dealers on certain floors and obtaining items. You can also obtain a scroll and book after making enough progress. The book allows you to check the stats of any enemies present on the current floor you're on. Unlike a typical RPG, you automatically start fighting once you get close to an enemy and the game refuses to let you fight enemies if it decides you're too weak to kill them. This combined with the fact that it isn't completely intuitive to figure out which enemies are stronger or not makes beating the game a process of trial and error.
Treasure Peeker Wii clone Generic platformer. Uses sprite graphics.
Variety Show Wii clone Also known as Jugglery and Juggling from the names of the .ELF file and data folder respectively. A juggling game that uses two controllers, utilizing the motion inputs in both to register juggling.
Video Poker Wii clone Uses faux-Windows UI.
Wave Man Wii clone A Snow Bros. clone with original graphics.
Western Hero Wii clone A western-themed shooter game starring a cowboy that plays similarly to Metal Slug.
Wolf is coming Wii clone A puzzle game where you control a wolf that has to gather all the pigs in each level while avoiding boars that will throw apples at you if they see you.
Zippy Race Wii clone Presumably based on the Famicom/NES game of the same name, with both using motorcycles, though its gameplay is largely original in comparison. Uses sprite graphics.

Utilities[]

Game Title Platform type Notes
Calculator Wii clone Features a custom design for the calculator resembling a bear.
Coloring Wii clone A digital coloring book program.
Make Musical Notation Wii clone A music composer program. Uses faux-Windows UI.
Painting Wii clone A clone of Microsoft Paint. It closely resembles the pre-Windows 7 versions of MS Paint, with a nearly identical layout and faux-Windows UI.

References[]

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